Roberto Alomar Signed Bat

This framing project was all about showcasing a signed Roberto Alomar baseball bat.  The finished product is a great example of what we can do here at Walkerworks as it highlights many of our unseen talents.

Our client, Jeff, and his buddy, Brian,  brought in Jeff’s bat.  He had acquired it during a live sports auction and he wanted both it and the Certificate of Authenticity framed.

We determined that we’d use Blue Jay blue for the matting, with black accents.  Due to the depth, our frame choice was our deep black shadowbox moulding (Larson Juhl’s deep confetti), double stacked. We also decided not to show the white bevels in the windows, so all windows were cut with a reverse bevel.

Here’s the design that we came up with, using our visualization software (please click on images to see them larger) :

With our visualization software, we can get a feel for how the project will turn out.

With our visualization software, we can get a feel for how the project will turn out.

I felt though that there was just too much open blue space below the bat on either side of the certificate.  Being a graphic designer, Brian had an awesome idea to fill it in with the Blue Jays logo and Alomar’s signature.  Here is the mock-up that he was able to supply me with:

The client was able to give me file for the Blue Jays logo and Robbie's signature.  This is the visualization with them inserted on either side of the Certificate of Authenticity.

This is the visualization with the Blue Jays logo and Alomar’s signature inserted on either side of the Certificate of Authenticity, how they’d look debossed onto the matting.

Brian was also able to supply me with the jpeg files of both.  Using our computerized mat cutter, our Wizard, I then imported the images, traced them and made them into cut art.  My first samples with the logos debossed didn’t cut the mustard, however.  They were too subtle to stand out against the blue mat.

I figured that if I first used the pen tool, then debossed the logos, it might stand out more.  I was right, it was actually perfect.

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I traced the Blue Jay logo using the Wizard’s Path Trace technology and then had the Wizard write and deboss it onto the mat to the left of the certificate. (close up, no glass)

Close up of finished Jays' logo.

Close up of finished Jays’ logo, under glass.

Alomar's signature with the date he was inducted into the Hall of Fame (2001) were written onto the mat and then debossed using our Wizard.

Alomar’s signature with the date he was inducted into the Hall of Fame (2001) were written onto the mat and then debossed using our Wizard. (close up, no glass)

 

Close up of finished signature under glass.

Close up of finished signature under glass.

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Certificate of Authencity with reverse bevel triple mat.

But, figuring out the matting was only a part of the equation.  Next, Jimmy needed to design and create the mounts for the bat.

He shaped and stained hard maple (same wood as the bat) holders for both ends of the bat.  Using invisible heavy duty thread, he attached the bat to the mounts.

The bat is test mounted.

The bat is test mounted.

Bat is perfectly positioned  using a template mat.

Bat is perfectly positioned using a template mat.

Next was raising the mat pack up and making the bat shadowbox.  When I pondered the original design, I decided that instead of raising the mats the full depth of the box, I wanted to make a half and half shadowbox.  This is what I call a design where we have some of the depth around the object itself (raising the matting), then the frame shadowboxed to create the rest of the depth needed.

Using acid free foamboard, I built up the mat pack to accommodate half of the bat's depth, and shadowboxed the bat window.

Using acid free foamboard, I built up the mat pack to accommodate half of the bat’s depth, and shadowboxed the bat window with the same blue suede that the bat is mounted onto.

Next, the frame.  With the bat’s depth, we needed to double stack our moulding.  Jimmy went into the woodshop and came out with his double stack.  For the best looking stack, we like to spend the time filling the space between the frames…. a time consuming job, but like everything else in this project, well worth it.

We always fill the corners of our frames.  In this case, we also filled the space between the frames.

We always fill the corners of our frames. In this case, we also filled the space between the frames.

When the frame was ready, Tru-Vue’s Museum glass was inserted and the sides of the frame shadowboxed with the same blue as the top mat.  After ensuring that everything was perfect, the only thing left to do was put it all together.  You’d think this would be quick and painless… the reality is that is generally takes awhile of fiddling to make sure there isn’t any detritus left inside the box and that everything is aligned and perfect.

The 3 finished components are ready to fit together.

The 3 finished components are ready to fit together.

Once we are satisfied, the back is finished with our black backing paper and large Wall Buddies for hanging.

And voila! One awesomely cool framed bat is born.  Like it?  It is now for sale online at : strev613.wix.com/alomarsite

 

The finished product.

The finished product.

 

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